YUNG CHUCK: His whole entire soundcloud page

You know when you’re browsing youtube late at night. You’re watching some minecraft videos, and before you know it you’re watching some freaky shit. Whether it’s pimple popping videos, people acting crazy on police cams, weird schizophrenic streamers, we all have gone down that rabbit hole.

I’ve only touched on youtube, but I believe I’ve found the weird part of soundcloud, and God damn is it amazing. YUNG CHUCK is an enigma wrapped in a mystery. At one point he will floor you with his creativity only to say, “Fuck it, I’m going to throw in random anime samples because why not?” It’s that kind of mystery in an artist that has everybody intrigued, where the thin line of genius and insanity is so razor sharp thin.

Now obviously since I’m not doing a review on an album but instead an entire soundcloud page this is going to be different than most reviews. I’ll mainly just be using songs to illustrate my point.

So let’s begin with weeoweeoweeo first off the name should kind of give you a hint as to what artist he is. Nobody who is trying to “make it” in the conventional sense would ever name their song weeoweeoweeo, unless there is some untapped market of people looking up nonsense song titles. Secondly one of the really interesting parts of YUNG CHUCK is that he will establish such great ideas, only to abandon it, destroy it, or let it devolve into gibberish.

Which is so refreshing to hear. As I’ve said before, yeah sincerity is a great thing to have in music. But if we look to the Kurt Cobain’s, Tupac’s, Jimi Hendrix’s, Jim Morrison’s we’re only going to kill ourselves or get killed. When an artist takes something so personal, and individualistic as music and completely makes a joke out of it, you’re either going to be pissed or laughing your ass off by the sheer audacity of it.

So to begin with this track begins with weeoweeoweeo and then there’s this vicious synth, and these edgy lyrics which you will hear so often on cloudrap. Then he raps about his nipples. It’s at this point where if you don’t get what he’s doing then please invest in my magical healing crystals on Ebay I really really need the cash.

Now the beginning of that song is so well executed (besides the weeoweeoweeo). It sounds so much like that edgelord cloudrap that you hear all the time. That YUNG CHUCK really shows his hand that he is more talented than you would be led to believe. In fact I would place money that he could easily make that kind of edgelord trap music, but the fact he abandons it so easily kind of shows the fragility of that particular music genre.

Nearly every aspect of this song, and nearly every aspect of every other song he does is almost a commentary of the state of underground music. Where anime samples are overused to death, males bragging about some false sense of machismo, edgelords being edgelords, etc. Because as soundcloud artists would like you to believe they’re popping Xanax, shooting cops, and catching up on the latest episode of My Hero Academia. It’s all nonsense, nothing on the internet is real, and yet people will still slop this shit up. Which is why in those song in particular I love the Jimmy Neutron Carl sample, almost so anti everything that soundcloud rap is, that is in and of itself is hilarious.

Now if you don’t believe me that YUNG CHUCK isn’t a talented producer then listen to Harvey Bean (beat)  which sounds so amazing. It’s the kind of song you want experimental hip hop to sound like. The song borders on being a cacophony of noise yet at the same time being so incredibly harmonious. It’s this kind of song where you see what YUNG CHUCK would be if he wasn’t poking fun at soundcloud, or just having fun on soundcloud (I have no idea what his motivations are.) Whether it’s crafted on a DAW or he uses samples, the point remains that it sounds amazing.

The same principle can apply to Achieve Nirvana which has this amazing rock track. Whether it’s sampled, or handmade is irrelevant. Since the does such a great job of switching between genres, beats, vibes, etc. And it all sounds amazing.

Which brings me to my next point. Remember when I wrote that article about Cringe? In that article I wrote that artists will purposefully sound mediocre, and goosestep in line because they’re so afraid that people will ridicule their music. Which is something so incredibly annoying, and draining to music as a whole. Yet YUNG CHUCK is probably the most fearless person I’ve ever seen online in my entire life.

I can’t tell you how many artists I’ve seen take professional headshots, go to photoshoots, pay people money to get “Professional” music videos, and all of it to look “legitimate.” Then there’s YUNG CHUCK in a school girl outfit. Which I love so much. There’s nothing more satisfying than seeing someone dump a bucket of ice cold water on a party. Especially when everybody takes themselves so seriously.

Yet what’s truly ironic is that YUNG CHUCK is succeeding more than these wannabe “Professionals.” Why? Well, if you’re in a creative field and you want to be successful, then why don’t you–I dunno–BE CREATIVE!

So with everything his image, to the music he makes, the bizarre lyrics, to the absurd samples. Everything is just a breath of wild and crazy air. That you cannot help but enjoy. And if you don’t enjoy it, then you don’t get it, and you’ll need to reread this whole entire article all over again.

With his unique approach to music, his image, and everything else. I can’t help but give this guy my recc. Check him out, and hopefully you’ll get as much joy out of him as I did.

Rat Riley: TrapTronic – EP (Disc 1)

 

 

Do you remember that one kickback you went to? The one where everybody was having  a great time, you met a cute girl, and you escaped the party to talk about life? You shared your life stories committing seppuku and spilling your guts to each other.

This album brings back those nostalgic call backs to youth. Back when everything seemed so much more fun. Weed wasn’t boring yet, girls didn’t lose their luster, and the responsibilities of adulthood seemed so far away.

This album is really beautiful from the track Morning After although seems to be about hangovers, they’re the type of hangovers that are still fun. The kind that drinking a gatorade and popping an advil will cure, and that really is 100% worth it since the night before was so fun.

TrapTronic the piano that creates this whirlwind of butterflies in the stomach, and the distorted vocals piercing through as though your heart is beating through your chest. As you finally realize that you’re attracted to the girl you’re talking to and not only that–she’s attracted to you as well.

Full Moon with it’s vocal samples is a much more sensual song. It’s not the three pump dump kind of deal I’m talking about either. This song oozes with sexuality, the type of sex that lasts long, feels great, and makes you feel like a champion. The only problem with the track is that minor sample with the crow caw. Yet it still fits with the song, I’m just off the deep end on how this album made me feel. Personal interpretation and all that jazz.

Forlorn with it’s synthesized keys sounds very similar to TrapTronic, yet with the occasional echoed synth creates a feeling of anxiety. The encroachment of adulthood. The realization that all of those things in the past, are becoming that–in the past.

Traptronic – EP Disc (1) is one of those rare trap albums that’s not some guy plucking away on a DAW making cacophonous sounds that doesn’t even really sound like music. It’s wonderfully made, and creates a whirlwind of emotion. My interpretation, is just that–my interpretation. The feelings and emotion still remain to anybody who takes a listen. Whether it calls you back to your favorite book you read on a rainy day, to staying up all night playing video games with your bros, or even “Passing the herbs” –it captures the youth and nostalgia that’s now in the past.

So with review I give this album my recc.

 

St. Wave: Troposphere

 

 

 

So from thesis of the album “Telling a story of moral conflict within a mind of an introvert, striving to be a better individual. From one Millennial to another.” The album already has grandiose claims.

What I mean by grandiose is that every single person in America has become an armchair psychologist for millennials. That the reason for our lack of agency, histrionics, or whatever; is the result of trophies for everyone, being taught that we were all special snowflakes, etc. You get the picture. You’ve heard it before.

St. Wave with his unique lyricism paints us a portrait that most pundits, armchair psychologists, simply just can’t grasp.

The music in Troposphere Vol. 1 has this melancholy atmosphere that seeps through every sound. It’s a melancholy that can only be expressed by someone that has experienced what life has to offer–which isn’t much.

St. Wave with his introversion is very introspective, and as a result very insightful. He’s not like the typical rapper who boasts of his success, lectures others, and tells the classic from drug dealer to mogul story.

St. Wave isn’t like that, he’s somebody who strives for higher heights, who knows he deserves better, no song better encapsulates this than Troposphere, yet we “We walk alone in this day and age, a generation misunderstood.”

The paths to success or even to start a family, something that all previous generations had so easily been to obtain, seems to allude us. We aren’t able to go work for a high paying job straight out of high school, we aren’t able to get a degree and get the career we want, we aren’t able to do these things. So what else is there to do but to indulge in hedonism. We have no future– so why not smoke weed, drink, and hook up with chicks?

Yet St. Wave wants a better life. He wants to be a better man and LiVE EVIL–my personal favorite track on this album–encapsulates the inner turmoil that an average millennial faces from social pressures, giving into temptation, giving into sin, resulting in the self defeating chorus of “I give in everytime.”

I’ll paraphrase C.S. Lewis–because St. Wave has a soul unlike most contemporary artists–that everybody on earth always feels like there’s something missing. Because we have souls we always feel like we’re missing out on a grand adventure; that we all want to get on, but somehow can’t. As a result our lives feel empty, physical pleasures lose their allure, we become alienated from one another, and even love as St. Wave on Wine puts it “Doesn’t feel enough.”

Millennials with all of our drugs, instant gratification, materialism, hook ups, and everything else still can’t find the thing that we yearn for. What that is–alludes us. But the diagnosis the symptoms of the disease of the soul we have is no where better laid out than by St. Wave’s Troposphere Vol. 1.

I give this album my recc.

 

 

Phosfiend: Guilty Machines

 

 

Thank God there’s still originality in rap. Since it’s formation it’s always been highly contentious. Soul Train host Don Cornelius didn’t even regard it as a respectable form of art.

These days, it can be difficult to argue against that point. With thotcore and mumblecore dominating the scene, hiphop can seem to be leading the race to the bottom of the barrel, but that’s really an unfair and frankly ignorant stance to take.

Right off the bat, Phosfiend’s voice stands out as excellent. At first it seems like the type of voice that would fit perfectly in a metal band, so to hear that voice dedicated to rapping is a welcome juxtaposition. His unique vocal style give his songs an almost operatic tone.

The music varies wildly from a moog synthesizer, to heavy or reverbed out guitars, to bizarre sounding sitars. Everything is experimental, yet familiar.

The best way to describe his music that it is the 00’s sound. Not the mainstream sound that we remember, but the sound that we will nostalgically recall.

For example, everybody says that synthwave is the recreation of 80’s music. It’s not. It’s the nostalgic recreation of the ideal 80’s music, of those B movies that always promised a terrible, scary monster, accompanied by that infamous arpeggiated synth, but just delivered a guy in a rubber suit and overused stock music.

Phosfiend does that with the 00’s music; reconstructs the ideal, not the actual. For example, those rock-sounding vocals and the heavy guitars in Mad God seem like they could fit with any nu metal band of the 00’s–except that they wouldn’t. Nu metal offered a fusion of hip hop and heavy metal, but ultimately ended in a cringe-fest. Phosfiend– very much like synthwave–nostalgically recreates and delivers on the promises of the that scene, giving his listeners something they can’t help but feel they’ve been waiting for.

From the emo guitar in 2 Woke 2 Cope, to the lyrics of Guilty Machines discussing theology, every song is a fulfillment of what was 00’s aggressive music promised but never delivered.

When I think of that time I’ll always remember playing MK4 with friends late at night and listening to Papa Roach. Mad God (my favorite track on the album) seems to amalgamate these various sounds and invokes those feelings of nostalgia in a way that a lot of pop music can’t. It’s a sound that only somebody who lived and breathed in this century’s first decade can understand. It’s not something a studio hit-maker can produce on a whim. An excellent album worth checking out. I give it my recc